What is the result of Ohio’s unconstitutional school funding system?

Dena Sico is the co-chair of the parent organizing committee of the All in For Ohio Kids campaign and a member of the Ohio Organizing Collaborative.

What does it say about our community, indeed our nation, that the 2022 school year was disrupted over things as basic as air conditioning?

The state’s largest school district, Columbus City Schools, recently reached a new collective bargaining agreement with the Columbus Education Association allowing children and teachers to return to school.

While the contract dispute has been resolved, the underlying issue of failure to fully (and fairly) fund public schools remains.

Not just for Ohio, but for the nation.

Dena Sico is the co-chair of the parent organizing committee of the All in For Ohio Kids campaign and a member of the Ohio Organizing Collaborative.

I offer this observation not from a perch of distance and comfort, but as a mother of a child in Columbus schools. I must also acknowledge that I have the privilege to use my voice in this way while many families in our district do not.

Our View:Contract didn’t fix Columbus schools. Mice, roaches, dated classes among concerns

For years, Ohio’s school funding formula has been unjust and unfair. For instance, “In 1997, in DeRolph v. State, the Ohio Supreme Court declared the State’s school funding system unconstitutional, specifically citing four major flaws in the system, including insufficient state funding for school facilities and a flawed school funding formula. The Court wrote: “‘A system without basic instructional materials and supplies can hardly constitute a thorough and efficient system of common schools throughout the state as mandated by our Constitution.'”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button